E-mu Keyboards Cincinnati OH

-mu's LONGboard 61 and SHORTboard 49 are the first E-mu hardware keyboards since the Proteus PK-6. Combining robust MIDI controller functions and great internal sounds from the best of the Proteus family is enough bang-for-buck given that these bad boys sell for real-world prices of about $400 for the 61-key version and $350 for the 49-key version. But E-mu upped the ante from there. They have aftertouch, which is pretty much unheard of in synths at this price.

Buddy Rogers Music Inc
(513) 729-1950
6891 Simpson Avenue
Cincinnati, OH
 
Expert Electronics
(513) 923-9200
6146 Colerain Ave
Cincinatti, OH
 
Neil Harrell's String
(513) 385-7535
5562 Goldenrod Drive
Cincinnati, OH
 
Buddy Rogers Music Inc-Dns
(513) 931-6780
1939 W Galbraith Road
Cincinnati, OH
 
Sam Ash Music
(513) 671-4500
11805 Commons Drive
Cincinnati, OH
 
Neil Harrell's
(513) 385-7535
Cincinnati, OH
 
Buddy Rogers Music Center
(513) 729-1950
1939 W Galbraith Rd
Cincinnati, OH
 
Buddy Rogers Music Center
(513) 729-1950
6891 Simpson Ave
Cincinnati, OH
 
Guitar Center Cincinnati
(513) 671-4555
640 Kemper Commons Circle
Cincinnati, OH
Store Information
Mon-Thur: 11-9
Fri: 10-9
Sat: 10-9
Sun: 12-6

Guitar Center #613
(513) 671-4555
640 Kemper Commons Circle
Cincinnati, OH
 

E-mu Keyboards

E-mu's LONGboard 61 and SHORTboard 49 are the first E-mu hardware keyboards since the Proteus PK-6. Combining robust MIDI controller functions and great internal sounds from the best of the Proteus family is enough bang-for-buck given that these bad boys sell for real-world prices of about $400 for the 61-key version and $350 for the 49-key version. But E-mu upped the ante from there. They have aftertouch, which is pretty much unheard of in synths at this price.

They have a small but intelligently-chosen complement of knobs, to control filter cutoff and resonance, and envelope attack and release (or decay, depending on the patch). When you think about it, that's the stuff you reach for 90% of the time, anyway: "This pad would make a great comping sound if only it had a quicker attack," or "A little more (or less) cutoff, and this lead would be perfect." On top of that, both models transmit audio wirelessly to an E-mu PIPEline receiver you can patch into your mixer. With guitar-strap pins on the 49-key model, you've got a real wireless synth.

E-mu's Michael Lee dropped both review units off at our mothership, and editor Stephen Fortner got to try them out in these videos. If you can't see the window below, CLICK HERE to open the video separately.

 

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