The Chord Doctor - Expand Your Chordal Command Annapolis MD

The chord chart for what I play could be the same for accompanying a number of different artists, but how I voice those chords may be radically different depending on the music. To illustrate that, Examples 1-5 present the same eight-bar chord progression in a variety of contexts — proof positive that the same chord can sound completely different depending on how you voice it.

Orlando S.
(877) 231-8505
Nettleton Court
Windsor Mill, MD
Subjects
Singing, Piano, Opera Voice, Theatrical Broadway Singing, Speaking Voice, Songwriting, Music Theory
Ages Taught
10 to 99
Specialties
Voice, Beginning Piano, Singing, opera Voice, Music Theory, Theatrical Broadway Singing, Ear Training, Sight Singing, Sight Reading, Speaking Voice, Songwriting Bel Canto, Old World Technique, Belting, Broadway, Opera, Oratorio, Art Song, Sacred Music, R&B, Jazz, Beginning Piano
Education
Parkville HIgh School - Computer Science - 8/2001 - 5/2005 UMBC - Vocal Performance and Composition - 8/2005 - 5/2009 Peabody Institute - 8/2009- 5/2011 Pursuing Master's in voice
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TakeLessons Music Teacher

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Orlando S.
(877) 231-8505
Old Court Rd
Riderwood, MD
Subjects
Singing, Piano, Opera Voice, Theatrical Broadway Singing, Speaking Voice, Songwriting, Music Theory
Ages Taught
10 to 99
Specialties
Voice, Beginning Piano, Singing, opera Voice, Music Theory, Theatrical Broadway Singing, Ear Training, Sight Singing, Sight Reading, Speaking Voice, Songwriting Bel Canto, Old World Technique, Belting, Broadway, Opera, Oratorio, Art Song, Sacred Music, R&B, Jazz, Beginning Piano
Education
Parkville HIgh School - Computer Science - 8/2001 - 5/2005 UMBC - Vocal Performance and Composition - 8/2005 - 5/2009 Peabody Institute - 8/2009- 5/2011 Pursuing Master's in voice
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TakeLessons Music Teacher

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Ananda N.
(877) 231-8505
Prestancia Pl
Waldorf, MD
Subjects
Music Theory, Percussion, Piano
Ages Taught
6 to 99
Specialties
I use beginner music theory, exercises, scales, arpeggios, sight reading. I like to use books by Bastien and Thompson. I teach classical, jazz and modern piano styles. I personally specialized in Baroque, traditional classical, and modern 20th Century music. I have also used Czerny and Hanon for technique exercises.
Education
Eagan High School - - Sep 1997-June 2001 (High School diploma received) Normandale Community College - Liberal Arts - (Associate degree received)
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TakeLessons Music Teacher

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Jessica P.
(877) 231-8505
Ridgewood Avenue
Chevy Chase, MD
Subjects
Upright Bass, Cello, Piano, Music Theory
Ages Taught
5 to 99
Specialties
pop, traditional, classical, baroque, renaissance
Education
Juilliard Pre-College - Double Bass Performance - 1998-1999 (High School diploma received) Eastman School of Music - Double Bass Performance - 1999-2003 (Bachelor's degree received) Cincinnati College Conservatory - Double Bass Performance - 2003-2005 (Master's degree received) Stony Brook University - Double Bass Performance - 2005-Present (not complete)
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Kimble Ken Piano and Kindermusik
(410) 268-2149
Annapolis, MD
 
Music By Julee
Baltimore, MD
 
James G.
(877) 231-8505
Harrowdale Street,
Baltimore, MD
Subjects
Songwriting, Piano, Music Theory, Guitar, Music Performance
Ages Taught
4 to 99
Specialties
I studied and performed jazz guitar in college, though I perform a wide variety of genres (pop, rock, blues, show tunes, etc.) professionally. My specialties on piano would be pop and rock, as well as beginning piano in any genre.
Education
University of Maryland Baltimore County - music performance-jazz-guitar - 8/2005-5/2009 (Bachelor's degree received)
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TakeLessons Music Teacher

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Ian D.
(877) 231-8505
Main St.,
Ellicott City, MD
Subjects
Piano
Ages Taught
1 to 99
Specialties
music, piano, jazz piano Jazz
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Richard P.
(877) 231-8505
N Rolling Road
Windsor Mill, MD
Subjects
Piano, Music Theory
Ages Taught
6 to 99
Specialties
music, piano, music theory classical, hymn playing
Education
Calvary Baptist School - College Prep - 1994-1998 Bob Jones University - Church Music, Piano - 1998-2002 Bob Jones University - Church Music, Piano - 2002-2004
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Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University
(410) 269-5343
Annapolis, MD
 
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The Chord Doctor - Expand Your Chordal Command

by Clifford Carter

You hear that the government is contemplating another multi-billion dollar stimulus package. That’s an intimidating number I can’t even digest. A much kinder, gentler number is 12 — the number of notes in the chromatic scale. This month, we’ll scratch the surface of combining those notes into chord colors appropriate for different styles of music.

The chord chart for what I play could be the same for accompanying a number of different artists, but how I voice those chords may be radically different depending on the music. To illustrate that, Examples 1-5 present the same eight-bar chord progression in a variety of contexts — proof positive that the same chord can sound completely different depending on how you voice it. Example 6 gives you hands-on practice material to start expanding your chord comfort zone. The ultimate goal is that regardless of whatever curve the music throws you, you can choose your next voicing without overthinking.

One last thing: Notice the simple left hand parts in the bass clefs throughout. It’s good to practice more than one thing at a time, and you don’t want an idle hand. By playing a bass line, you give the right hand a musical context, while developing hand independence. You’re also working on your timing, and making what could be a somewhat tedious exercise a bit more fun and musical.

Click the sheet music thumbnails for super-size versions suitable for playing! Click the example headers for audio clips.

kb0210 Plat It Chord Doc 1 Ex. 1 - click for audio. Here’s an eight-bar progression I’d play on, say, the first verse of a Patti Scialfa song. It’s simple and sparse with not a lot of movement — a nice bed. All chords are either triads or four-note chords with one of the triad’s notes doubled. The exceptions are bars 3 and 6, where I’m just playing the root and fifth in each hand. Why? Because Nils Lofgren is next to me playing some fat, soulful chords unique to the guitar, and I want to get out of his harmonic space. By eliminating thirds at that moment, it avoids any clashes or unnecessary doubling.

0210 Play It Chord Doc 2 Ex. 2 - click for audio . I’d play in the second verse with more character and rhythmic action. By simply using the ninth of each chord, we get a new sound, moving the piano a little more to the forefront.

0210 Play It Chord Doc 3 Ex. 3 - click for audio . In this variation on Example 2, I add the fourth in addition to the ninth. It’s similar in style but adds new harmonic identity. This style of adding fourths and ninths (or “twos and fours”) is very guitar-like, and a signature sound of guitar bands like the Byrds and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. Many pianists have taken cues from guitar-oriented voicings when playing triad-based music. Listen to Elton John, Billy Joel, Matt Rollings, and the E Street Band’s Roy Bittan to get these new sounds into your hands and ears.

0210 Play It Chord Doc 4 Ex. 4 - click for audio. Here’s the same basic progression, played with a gospel or R&B style. I recently played in the Baltimor...

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